Explore the Inside Of Steve Jobs’ Abandoned Jackling Mansion

Steve Jobs was often in the public eye as the cofounder and CEO of Apple.  This included many of aspects of his private life including his battle with cancer and ensuing death in 2011.  But one of the lesser known items of his life was the story of the battle for the Jackling Mansion.

The Jackling House was built in 1925 as a residence for copper mining baron Daniel Cowan Jackling and his family. Famed Californian architect George Washington Smith designed and built the stunning 17,000 square foot home.

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Jobs bought the property after his early successes with Apple, and he lived there for around a decade.  After moving out, he rented the home until around 2000.  At that point, Jobs stopped maintaining it.  It didn’t take long for the huge property to start to fall into disrepair.

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Jobs decided to raze the existing structure so that he could replace it with a more modest home for his family.  Figures showed that this was around $5 cheaper than restoring the mansion.  In 2004, he received permission from Woodside to move forward.

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However, the community immediately responded against the destruction of the mansion.  They argued that it represented one of the few remaining examples of a Spanish Colonial Revival style home and should be preserved.

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They even claimed that Jobs had let the mansion decay so that he would be able to obtain permission to knock it down.

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The legal battle lasted from 2004 to 2011.  Jobs and his lawyer returned to court time after time in an attempt to gain the necessary demolition permits.

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Jobs ultimately won the battle and the permits were granted in 2011.  The house was torn down just months before his death.

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While the home was abandoned, photographer Jonathan Haeber found the gate open and was able to enter and capture these incredible photos before the building was gone forever.

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The home feature a full pipe-organ.

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Despite the crumbling condition, its easy to see how incredible this home must have been.

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Source: appleinsider.com, weburbanist
Images: Jonathan Haeber